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The other type of quantum unicorns

16
July
,
2021

These days, there is a lot of talk about quantum unicorns — quantum computing companies that are worth over a billion dollars. It’s a sign of investors taking note of the huge potential of quantum computing and putting their money where their mouth is.

But before billion-dollar companies, there was the historical definition of a unicorn. As Merriam-Webster defines it: “something unusual, rare, or unique.”

Today, there are few people capable of creating meaningful quantum circuits. That’s because quantum programming using today’s tools is hard: it requires an understanding of quantum physics, linear algebra, entanglement, and more.

What’s even rarer — a true unicorn — is someone that can program a quantum circuit AND that has domain-specific expertise. After all, the promise of quantum computing is to address difficult problems in the supply chain, finance, cybersecurity, material science, and more. But how can you address these difficult problems if you don’t understand the field in which they operate?

The solution is to make it possible to integrate domain experts without requiring them to have a deep understanding of quantum physics. After all, a top-tier graphics artist does not necessarily understand how the CPU on which they run their rendering software works. A chef might not know how to build a blender. An architect might not be a very good plumber. To be able to solve more problems with quantum computing, we need to allow the domain experts to express what they wish to happen, the “what do I want to do” without worrying about “how exactly does it get built”.

At Classiq, we work hard every day to make this a reality.

These days, there is a lot of talk about quantum unicorns — quantum computing companies that are worth over a billion dollars. It’s a sign of investors taking note of the huge potential of quantum computing and putting their money where their mouth is.

But before billion-dollar companies, there was the historical definition of a unicorn. As Merriam-Webster defines it: “something unusual, rare, or unique.”

Today, there are few people capable of creating meaningful quantum circuits. That’s because quantum programming using today’s tools is hard: it requires an understanding of quantum physics, linear algebra, entanglement, and more.

What’s even rarer — a true unicorn — is someone that can program a quantum circuit AND that has domain-specific expertise. After all, the promise of quantum computing is to address difficult problems in the supply chain, finance, cybersecurity, material science, and more. But how can you address these difficult problems if you don’t understand the field in which they operate?

The solution is to make it possible to integrate domain experts without requiring them to have a deep understanding of quantum physics. After all, a top-tier graphics artist does not necessarily understand how the CPU on which they run their rendering software works. A chef might not know how to build a blender. An architect might not be a very good plumber. To be able to solve more problems with quantum computing, we need to allow the domain experts to express what they wish to happen, the “what do I want to do” without worrying about “how exactly does it get built”.

At Classiq, we work hard every day to make this a reality.

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